Jeanne Owens, author

Blog about author Jeanne Owens and her writing


4 Comments

Available Now – Chronicles of Riss: Adventures in Sorcery Paperback Edition

It’s here! It’s finally here! Woohoo!

What is? The paperback edition of my book, Chronicles of Riss: Adventures in Sorcery, that’s what! After debating it for a while, I finally decided to have a paperback version of this short story collection. And now it’s here and Chronicles of Riss is no longer only available as an ebook. Now, those of you who prefer to hold an actual book in your hand to read instead of an e-reader can enjoy this book full of fun, fantastical adventures.

 

chroniclesofriss_pb

Confronting evil sorcerers. Fighting monsters. Dueling metal golems. Searching for a sea monster. Hunting lost treasure. Finding a missing show dog. Competing in talent contests. Helping lost children. These are just some of the widely varied exploits that the young mercenary sorceress Marissa “Riss” Cobalt shares in this second Adventures in Sorcery book. Riss reveals how she ended up as a mercenary and chronicles some of the many adventures, ranging from fun to serious, that she’s had prior to the events of Kismet and Tell.

 

 

 

 

Get it now on Amazon by clicking here.

You can get the ebook version on Amazon here and at other online bookstores, like Barnes & Noble.


2 Comments

Where was I? #multitasking

Story Empire

Hi, SE friends! Thanks for visiting. You’re with Mae today. Do you remember when no one uttered the word multitasking? When, in the (dinosaur) days of business, projects were conducted one at a time? That manner of productivity seems to have gone the way of roller skate keys and S & H Green Stamps. Who among us doesn’t multitask? I do it on my day job and as an author. It can be mentally exhausting, stressful, and not as efficient as we think.

The other day, I left a simple two-line message for a group I’m connected with through a social platform. Eleven words total. When I went back and looked at it later, I realized there were two typos. Not the end of the world, but it’s embarrassing, and I find myself doing it more frequently. Throughout my (day) career, I have been known as a perfectionist, yet…

View original post 560 more words


Leave a comment

Chronicles of Riss – 5-Star Review

Okay, I admit to being a little slow and behind the times on checking things like this. I just noticed the other day that my book, the short-story anthology Chronicles of Riss, actually got a 5-star review – 4 years ago! Shame on me. Shame, shame. But it’s easy to not think about things like this when you’re busy all the time with other things.

Anyway, here’s a screenshot of the review.

Screenshot 2020-07-12 at 11.45.00 AM

5-star review for Chronicles of Riss (ignore the broswer tabs)

“A very good read, love all the adventures. Very well written. Highly recommend this book.”

Okay, so it’s not a very in-depth review, but still, I’m glad they enjoyed the stories. The review is very much appreciated, and I thank whoever in Canada left it.

 

You can get your own copy of Chronicles of Riss on Amazon by clicking here. And don’t forget to check out the original Adventures in Sorcery book, Kismet and Tell  or the children’s book The Little Italian Traveling Chair.


Leave a comment

Writing & Gardening – 🌱🌺🥔🥕 📚 The Similarities #AmWriting

Lucy Mitchell

During lockdown my loved one found unexpected joy with gardening. He’s growing all sorts of stuff and has transformed our garden. I will also say his fingers are…getting greener by the day.

He’s done so wellI was gobsmacked at the SIZE and LENGTH of his carrots earlier this week. 🥕🥕🥕 Now, I never thought I would be discussing the size of my loved ones’s veg on my blog.

I’ve been watching him pottering about his vegetable and flower patches (when I should have been writing) and I have observed some similarities between writing and gardening.

  • The goofy smile. My loved one has a huge goofy happy smile when he talks about growing vegetables and flowers. It’s a similar smile to the one I have when I talk about writing romance.
  • An obsession with size and growth.My loved one is obsessed with the size of the green shoots coming out…

View original post 605 more words


2 Comments

Death, Disease & Pandemic: How Horror Writers In The Past Have Translated Illness (Part 3: Edgar Allan Poe and Anne Rice)

Zombie Salmon (the Horror Continues)

In the example of Bram Stoker we see how a writer makes sense of a pandemic when he or she is a witness to the event. With King and Matheson, we saw how a writer imagines living through the event. But what if pandemic actually claims someone you love?

Horror has two prominent writers whose lives were touched by such a personal loss in profound and painful ways, tearing at their very souls to the point that they did not so much choose to write about it, as much as they were tormented into doing so.

Both Edgar Allan Poe and Anne Rice lost close family members to the unthinkable: Poe repeatedly lost the women in his life to disease – most commonly tuberculosis, a pandemic that seemed unstoppable and endless in his lifetime. And Anne Rice lost her daughter to a new kind of pandemic: the kind that goes…

View original post 4,672 more words


Leave a comment

Words

Story Empire

Hey, SE Readers. Joan with you on this hot July day. Hey, we’ve made it halfway through 2020! That’s an accomplishment. But I prefer not to write about the year some people refer to as the twilight zone.

Honestly, I have a couple of topics for future posts, but I haven’t put them together. So, today I thought I’d write a lighthearted post about something near and dear to all authors.

Words.

A few weeks ago, the SE authors were chatting about words that aren’t often used these days. Dastardly, meaning wicked and cruel, is one of my favorites. Can’t help but think of Dick Dastardly and Mutley. (I love to hear Mutley laugh.)

The English language is forever changing. Words that once were common are now almost obscure, while others are used regionally.

  • Skedaddle – to flee; run away hurriedly
  • Rapscallion – a mischievous person
  • Gobsmacked – astonished; utterly…

View original post 260 more words


2 Comments

Union – Tuesday Use It In A Sentence #tuesdayuseitinssentence

The news that her father was planning to marry her off to the prince of the neighboring country without her consent angered her. She stormed to the king and told him she was against the union. After some discussion, she conditionally agreed to it, if she could meet  with the prince first. The king agreed. A few days later, the two met and sparks flew. She was also surprised to find that the prince had been against the union, as well, without  meeting her first.

 

 

This post is part of the Tuesday Use It In A Sentence prompt, “union”:

https://stephaniecolpron.wordpress.com/2020/07/07/tuesdayuseitinasentence-union/


2 Comments

Trace – Tuesday Use It In A Sentence #tuesdayuseitinasentence

Their relationship had already been on the rocks, but finding out about his affair had been the last straw. After she kicked him out, she tearfully began throwing out his things, determined to not let a single trace of him remain behind.

 

 

This post is part of the Tuesday Use It In A Sentence prompt, “trace”:

https://stephaniecolpron.wordpress.com/2020/06/30/tuesdayuseitinasentencetrace/