Jeanne Owens, author

Blog about author Jeanne Owens and her writing


6 Comments

Available Now – Chronicles of Riss: Adventures in Sorcery Paperback Edition

It’s here! It’s finally here! Woohoo!

What is? The paperback edition of my book, Chronicles of Riss: Adventures in Sorcery, that’s what! After debating it for a while, I finally decided to have a paperback version of this short story collection. And now it’s here and Chronicles of Riss is no longer only available as an ebook. Now, those of you who prefer to hold an actual book in your hand to read instead of an e-reader can enjoy this book full of fun, fantastical adventures.

 

chroniclesofriss_pb

Confronting evil sorcerers. Fighting monsters. Dueling metal golems. Searching for a sea monster. Hunting lost treasure. Finding a missing show dog. Competing in talent contests. Helping lost children. These are just some of the widely varied exploits that the young mercenary sorceress Marissa “Riss” Cobalt shares in this second Adventures in Sorcery book. Riss reveals how she ended up as a mercenary and chronicles some of the many adventures, ranging from fun to serious, that she’s had prior to the events of Kismet and Tell.

 

 

 

 

Get it now on Amazon by clicking here.

You can get the ebook version on Amazon here and at other online bookstores, like Barnes & Noble.


Leave a comment

How to increase book sales on Facebook – by Brian Meert…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

on Non Fiction Author Association:

Once you’ve published a book, promoting it on Facebook isn’t as easy as simply posting a photo of the cover and a link to where it can be purchased.

Your personal Facebook community may care about your most recent beach trip or your new puppy, but the audience you’ll promote your book to is completely different. Yes, you may get a few sales from good pals – and even truly interested friends and family – but, for the most part, your book audience is going to be elsewhere.

Here’s how to increase your book sales on Facebook.

Continue reading HERE

View original post


4 Comments

Date – Tuesday Use It In A Sentence #tuesdayuseitinasentence

She paused with her hand on the doorknob, turned and waved to him with a smile. He smiled and waved back, and as she entered her house he drove off, wondering again if the date had all been a dream. He still could hardly believe she’d agreed to go out with him, let alone agree to a second date. What had he done to deserve this happiness, he wondered.

This post is part of the Tuesday Use It In A Sentence prompt, “date”:

https://stephaniecolpron.wordpress.com/2020/09/29/tuesdayuseitinasentence-date/


Leave a comment

The Benefits of Writing a Novel By Hand – by Bryn Donovan…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

I love writing on paper. Few things spark joy in me like a brand-new spiral notebook—and that’s been true almost my whole life. Writing a novel longhand, at least for the first draft, is my personal preference. I don’t write the whole thing by hand before typing it: I transfer it to Word document on my computer now and then as I go.

Every writer is different, and I’m not going to claim that writing a novel by hand is right for everyone. I know that writing on paper isn’t even an option for everyone.

Besides, writing a novel longhand does have its disadvantages. It’s slower, since you’re going to wind up typing it on the computer later, anyway. And if you’re unable to decipher your own handwriting, which is true for lots of people, writing on paper for your first draft is pretty much a non-starter.

Here are a…

View original post 36 more words


2 Comments

The Future of Barnes and Nobles

Nicholas C. Rossis

Barnes and Noble | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's book

The Passive Guy recently shared a post by Jane Friedman on the future of Barnes & Noble; a topic you may remember from my earlier post, “How Amazon Destroyed Barnes & Noble.”

Quite frankly, Jane’s post made me sad. The latest chairman, James Daunt, is credited with saving UK’s famous bookstore, Waterstons. However, all you got to do is read the following quotes to understand that he really doesn’t get B&N – or books.

Early on, when Daunt was asked what he thought of Barnes & Noble on his last store visit, he said, “There were too many books,” by which he meant that featuring the right inventory is more important that stocking a big blur of titles. Back in 2015, he commented to Slate, “My faculties just shut down when I go in there.”

So… the big problem with a bookstore is that it has too…

View original post 883 more words


4 Comments

Capture – Tuesday Use It In A Sentence #tuesdayuseitinasentence

He sat at the library table and watched her from across the room as he always did, wanting so much to go talk to her but afraid to; she’d captured his heart from the moment he saw her weeks ago but he had no idea what to do to capture her heart in return.

 

This late post is part of the Tuesday Use It In A Sentence prompt, “capture”:

https://stephaniecolpron.wordpress.com/2020/09/24/tuesdayuseitinasentence-capture/


Leave a comment

The Best Fiction Story Ideas Come From A Simple Question – by Derek Haines…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

on Just Publishing Advice:

If you are writing fiction novels or short stories, you need story ideas.

Nothing happens on a blank page, and looking at it is the worst way to start writing.

A lot of writers use creative writing prompts, but they aren’t the best way to come up with original ideas.

Some writers wait for the muse to arrive, which usually works on a very unreliable schedule.

In This Article

Fiction story idea germs

Famous authors and small ideas
Ask yourself simple questions
Avoid writing prompts
Summary

Continue reading HERE

View original post


Leave a comment

5 reasons to follow literary agents on Twitter

Uninspired Writers

Getting an agent is a goal for many writers. And finding the right one is essential. To avoid wasting your time, and theirs, you should only submit to agents who represent your genre and are open to submissions. There are lots of ways you can find out more about agents, to help you make your choice. And if that agent has a Twitter account, be sure to give them a follow. (This is assuming they have a public account with a focus on their work.) Here are five reasons why:

Calls for submissions
Yes, some agents will post calls for submissions. If you are lucky, they’ll even post the kind of book they are looking for or even some of their preferences. This makes sure you are targeting them at a time when they are actively looking, and if your book matches something they’ve asked for, you can mention…

View original post 323 more words


Leave a comment

Things You Should Do With New Story Ideas #AmWriting

Lucy Mitchell

I believe brand new story ideas should be handled with care and attention.

Looking back I wish I had read a post like this when I was starting to take my writing seriously. I was so excited with my shiny new story ideas that I wanted to tell everyone I met about them. The trouble with this was that I didn’t realise a new idea is a fragile little thing. In the early days of its existence it’s not strong enough to withstand criticism from others. This scenario would often result in someone picking holes in my idea, my new story idea excitement evaporating and me reaching for my imaginary dustpan and brush to sweep up the remains of my new idea.

I also overlooked and dismissed many new story ideas because I had not thought about them for long enough. New ideas need time. They also should be left…

View original post 335 more words