Jeanne Owens, author

Blog about author Jeanne Owens and her writing


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Literary Larceny & Why People Should Be Ashamed – By Kristen Lamb…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Literary larceny is a new ‘trend’ that is normalizing stealing from authors. Stealing from authors—or anyone for that matter—is NOT okay. I know, I know. Some topics I shouldn’t even have to blog about. I mean what’s next for blog topics? “The Great Wonders of Using Toilet Paper,” “Why Kicking Puppies is Wrong” “Top Five Reasons Not to Eat Tide Pods.”

Yet, here we are. I know I just posted, but this couldn’t wait. It’s…it’s a problem.

Some people—not all people—should be deeply ashamed that I even have to post on this.

What is literary larceny? Other than a clever use of alliteration? This is when people believe, for some odd reason, that it is perfectly okay to buy an ebook, read it in full then return it…and just keep doing this repeatedly without ever actually paying for a book.

According to the article Writers riled by Amazon offering…

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The Secret Ingredient of Successful Openings – by Susan DeFreitas…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

on Jane Friedman site:

There’s something it took me years as an editor to figure out: many of the most common problems novelists face with their stories appear to be issues with plot but in fact are issues with character.

Openings that don’t quite work are a good example.

The conventional wisdom on the opening of a novel tells us that it must have:

  • A clear point of view
  • A compelling voice
  • Compelling characters
  • Specific details
  • Tension of some type

That’s all excellent advice. The only problem is, when writers think of “tension of some type,” they tend to think of external trouble—say, a car crash, or the protagonist being fired from her job.

This type of conflict might compel the reader’s attention for a few pages, but what really sucks us in—and what really makes agents and acquisitions editors sit up and take notice—is internal trouble, because it’s…

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