Jeanne Owens, author

Blog about author Jeanne Owens and her writing

Death, Disease & Pandemic: How Horror Writers In The Past Have Translated Illness (Part 3: Edgar Allan Poe and Anne Rice)

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Zombie Salmon (the Horror Continues)

In the example of Bram Stoker we see how a writer makes sense of a pandemic when he or she is a witness to the event. With King and Matheson, we saw how a writer imagines living through the event. But what if pandemic actually claims someone you love?

Horror has two prominent writers whose lives were touched by such a personal loss in profound and painful ways, tearing at their very souls to the point that they did not so much choose to write about it, as much as they were tormented into doing so.

Both Edgar Allan Poe and Anne Rice lost close family members to the unthinkable: Poe repeatedly lost the women in his life to disease – most commonly tuberculosis, a pandemic that seemed unstoppable and endless in his lifetime. And Anne Rice lost her daughter to a new kind of pandemic: the kind that goes…

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Author: jowensauthor

I'm a geeky, animal/cat-loving author of Fantasy and YA Fiction. I'm a supporter of animal charities such as the WWF. I'm also a fan of anime and sci-fi/fantasy. I'm an avid reader as well, and enjoy mainly reading fantasies, mysteries, and books about animals. I have a B.A. in History with a minor in English. I also dabble in making jewelry, reading tarot, and am interested in the paranormal. You can find out more about me and my various books and writings at my website: http://jeanneowens.weebly.com. You can also find me on Facebook, Google+, Tumblr, Twitter, Goodreads, and Pinterest.

2 thoughts on “Death, Disease & Pandemic: How Horror Writers In The Past Have Translated Illness (Part 3: Edgar Allan Poe and Anne Rice)

  1. Thank you for the reblog! I always appreciate the boost!

    Liked by 1 person

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